1975: The Year That Changed My Life

By Dr. John Reizer

I believe there are defining moments in every person’s life. For me, those defining moments occurred in the year 1975.

There’s a synchronicity to a life where different ingredients are borne into existence and remain hidden from you until such time that they magically appear out of nowhere and drastically alter your life.

In 1966, my mother took me to a pediatric wellness checkup. The doctor gave me a vaccine, and I vividly recall it hurt and burned my left arm terribly. The pain was so bad, I remember crying the entire car ride home. I was only three at the time.

From that day forward, I remember developing many nervous tics in my shoulders, neck, and jaw. The spasms would remain with me for the remainder of my life.

I did not know so at the time, but I had been the victim of a childhood vaccine injury.

The tics would become more noticeable to my parents and friends as I progressed through childhood. I always knew that they were tied to that shot I received.

I was better than an average athlete, and the nervous twitches often precluded me from performing at my best when playing sports.

The problem became so bad, it became difficult for me to finish schoolwork and other activities on time.

I had developed Tourette Syndrome, and it made me self conscious and afraid when I became surrounded by large groups of people. I was also terrified of having to speak in public or play baseball in front of a crowd of spectators. I was cognizant of the nervous tics, and they distracted me while performing in school or on the ball field.

In 1975 I was a member of a little league baseball team that won a world championship in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. The summer of that year changed my life forever.

The game was nationally televised, and many millions of people watched the event. There were also many thousands of people who attended the game.

Here’s the funny thing about life, the little league baseball experience helped me to overcome the fear I had developed of speaking or playing sports in front of large crowds. After playing baseball in front of thousands of people, and the game being televised nationally on ABC television, every other game or event I participated in was a smaller venue.

In 1975, I came out of my shell. I also would go on to become a proficient speaker and writer because of that season of baseball. I authored a book at age 15 about the baseball experience.

As the years passed, I have been able to drastically reduce the nervous tics I once had. They minimally affect me in the present day. A lot of that has had to do with my understanding of health and being able to mentally restructure the way I think.

The other thing that makes me believe our lives are tied to a synchronous system is that one of the four teams playing in the championship tournament back in 1975 was from Davenport, Iowa. Davenport is the birthplace of chiropractic. That profession would later become a significant part of my life.

I knew early in my life that I was supposed to teach people about the dangers of organized medicine and that vaccines were a threat to human life.

Every step and stage of my life has helped me learn and understand the importance of the situation currently unfolding. I was born to teach people about fraudulent medical activities being unleashed on society. I am positive there are others out there, like me, doing the same.

1975 Little League World Series Book Back in Print

By. Dr. John Reizer

This post has absolutely nothing to do with the craziness taking place in the world. I ‘ll get back to all that information soon enough.

Today’s article has to do with something from my past and I wanted to write about it here so interested individuals could access the pertinent information through Internet search engines.

In the summer of 1975, I had an opportunity to play on a baseball team that won the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. The experience was quite life changing and transformed me into the communicator, teacher and writer I am today.

Prior to this event, I was an introverted twelve year old who had difficulty expressing his thoughts to others. But the grand stage of playing baseball, in front of millions of spectators on national television, and interacting with sports reporters for over six straight weeks, magically changed me into an outgoing individual. Suddenly, I had lost the fear of speaking in public and found an interest in writing stories and eventually books.

After the Little League World Series, I authored a short book that chronicled our team’s success. I was still twelve years old when I wrote the manuscript, and it was published my freshman year in high school.

Over the past several years I have had many people contact me about this book. They wanted to obtain a copy, for one reason or another, and were unable to do so. Unfortunately, the book went out of print years ago, and the copies that were in circulation after the book’s publication have long since disappeared.

There are a few copies still floating around, and for sale on the Internet from antique book sellers, but those copies are not easy to acquire and quite expensive. Because there continues to be a demand for the book by baseball historians and some people residing in Ocean County, I have decided to republish the work and make it available once again.

It’s my hope that interested parties will enjoy reading, “Once in a Lifetime: The Story of a National Championship Little League Team” (the Second Edition) and reliving one of the most exciting sports events to ever impact the town of Lakewood, New Jersey and the entire Jersey Shore community.

Something Lighter From My Past (1975 Little League World Series)

By Dr. John Reizer

Founder of NoFakeNews

There are so many important things happening in the world right now and particularly in the United States. I know many of our readers will wonder why I am publishing this post today. The answer is because I simply needed to take a mental vacation from all the corruption taking place in the world. I promise it will still be there tomorrow.

I recently got my hands on a 41 year old movie of the 1975 Little League World Series that took place in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. The movie is special to me because I was a member of that team. For many years I tried to locate a copy of the network telecast of this game without any success. I even attempted to contact ABC television, the company that broadcast the game nationally in 1975, and was unsuccessful.

After cleaning out my parents’ home not too long ago, I unexpectedly uncovered a canister that contained a 10 minute movie that was marked, “Little League Championship Game.” I was very excited to see the film but lacked the necessary movie projector to do so. After taking the film to a company that could transfer its contents onto a DVD, I was finally able to see the highlights of this historical game.

In 1978, at the age of 15, I published a short book about our championship season titled, “Once In A Lifetime: The Story of A National Championship Little League Team”. The book, over the years, became the official record of the 1975 Lakewood Little League Team.

I recently uploaded the movie onto YouTube so that all the people of Lakewood, New Jersey could enjoy the footage that has been locked away in my parents’ attic for 41 years. I am not sure who made the film, but very thankful that they did.

To my former teammates and friends that experienced with me this magical ride in 1975, this video is for you!

John Reizer

Second Baseman

1975 Little League World Series 

Could The NFL Learn Something about Integrity from Little League Baseball?

By Dr. John L. Reizer

Editor at NoFakeNews.net

Little League Baseball’s decision to strip the 2014 Little League U.S. National title from a Chicago team earlier this week speaks volumes about the organization’s desire to maintain the integrity of its tournament.

Sometimes the appropriate and most just decisions in life are not easily swallowed by the public and their elected officials. According to mainstream media sources, the Mayor of Chicago, Rahm Emanuel asked Little League International to reverse its recent and very unpopular decision to strip Jackie Robinson West of its 2014 U.S. title. Despite the strong insistence by the Mayor and others opposing Little League International’s decision, Little League Baseball refused to yield to public outcries and remains confident that they did what was necessary to maintain the integrity of their game.

According to Little League officials, the Chicago based team that had earned a trip to the International title game after becoming the 2014 U.S. National Champions had inappropriately placed three players on their squad that were ineligible. The players had come from localities that were outside the designated areas where the Chicago team could legally draw eligible players from. Quite simply written, they broke the rules and were forced to embrace the consequences that go along with such actions.

As a former Little League Champion (1975 – Second Base – Lakewood New Jersey), I applaud this decision and the people that had the guts not to fold in the face of strong opposition from the general public. When I played in this tournament in 1975, foreign teams had been excluded because there had been “dirty dealings” with regards to ineligible players being placed on certain teams.

Perhaps NFL commissioner, Roger Goodell and its 32 owners could learn a thing or two from the actions of Little League Baseball and its corporate offices. Does the NFL have the guts to strip a Super Bowl title from one of its teams if it found, through an independent investigation, the team in question intentionally supplied unauthorized or unapproved equipment for use in its games?

In the grand scheme of things, an unfair advantage in sports equates to cheating. Little League or professional sports, the rules should be followed and when they are not, the appropriate actions should be taken by league officials.

What do you think about this subject?